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Image by Annie Spratt

Rosemary

botanical name: Rosmarinus officinalis

Celebrated for its robust flavour in culinary creations, rosemary is an antioxidant powerhouse that has a strong affinity for the head.

Key Features:

- tonic for the mind

- circulatory stimulant

- digestive aid

What does it do?

Brain health: with an affinity for the brain and head, rosemary is well renowned for its cognitive properties. Rich in antioxidants such as carnosic acid, it shields the brain from oxidative stress and inflammation, potentially reducing the risk of neurodegeneration.  Rosemary enhances cerebral circulation, helping to stimulate mental clarity, focus and memory as well as supporting hair growth.

Digestion: as a carminative, rosemary stimulates the secretion of digestive enzymes and calms gastrointestinal spasms. This encourages the breakdown of food and relieves bloating, gas, and indigestion.

Respiratory tract: acting as an expectorant, rosemary facilitates the loosening and expulsion of stubborn mucus, helping to clear coughs, colds, and congestion.

Circulation: rosemary has vasodilatory effects, helping to relax blood vessels, promote better blood flow and support overall circulatory function.

Pain & inflammation: packed with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds like rosmarinic acid and caffeic acid, rosemary lends itself well at helping to reduce inflammation, fluid retention and pain.

Image by Paul Hanaoka

Active Constituents

Rosmarnic acid

Essential oils

Phenolic diterpenes

Flavonoids

Triterpenoids

Parts Used

Leaves,

Root

Herbal Actions

Antioxidant

Antispasmodic

Diuretic

Stimulant

Nervine

Applications

Teas,

Tinctures,

Syrups,

Oils,

Aromatherapy

Precautions

Rosemary is relatively safe. Avoid high doses during pregnancy and lactation - culinary amounts are ok.

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