Image by Heather Barnes

Cinnamon

botanical name: Cinnamonum zeylanium

A common household spice, revered for its ability to help metabolise sugar and relieve a variety of ailments.

Key Features:

- helps regulate blood sugar

- relieves stagnation in the body

- manages gynaecological conditions

What does it do?

Controls blood sugar levels: there is evidence showing that cinnamon helps to enhance the ability of insulin to metabolise glucose better due to the presence of glutathione and MHCP (methylhydroxychalcone polymer) which helps to make fat cells more responsive to insulin. 

Digestive metabolism: its warming characteristics make it a wonderful remedy for stagnant and sluggish digestion and the carminative properties help to break up intestinal gas. It can help to support nutritional absorption and can actively destroy microbes indicated in many digestive problems such as Candida albicans and Helicobacter pylori.

Circulatory and respiratory support: as a warming herb, cinnamon helps to stimulate circulation particularly to the extremities, making it useful in arthritis, Raynaud's disease and any other circulatory insufficiencies. It also helps to lower serum cholesterol, support healthy blood pressure, relieve aching muscles and can encourage sweating to help clear fevers.

Kidney and bladder support: cinnamon's blood sugar regulating abilities can help to prevent kidney damage. It's astringent and antimicrobial qualities can also help ease frequent urination and suppress the cause of infections related to the urinary tract.

Reproductive health: Similarly to ginger, cinnamon has prostaglandin-inhibiting abilities making it great for relieving dysmenorrhoea (painful periods) and managing other gynaecological conditions such as ovarian cysts, fibroids and endometriosis.

Image by June Andrei George

Active Constituents

Cinnamaldehyde,

phenolic compounds,

tannins,

other volatile oils

Parts Used

Bark

Herbal Actions

Carminative

Antiseptic

Astringent

Anti-inflammatory

Stimulant

Applications

Teas,

Tinctures,

Salves,

Oils,

Syrups

Precautions

May be too warming when used in very large amounts (outside of food quantities) during pregnancy.